Rural Supplies
Livestock Market Update April 2019
18 April 2019

Livestock Market Update April 2019

Catch up on the latest market commentary from around the country in the April 2019 issue of the PGG Wrightson Livestock Market Update.

South Island Sheep & Beef

Calf sales have been the main focus in the South Island as the bulk of calves are sold throughout April.

To date, pricing has been $150 -$200 less than last year, due to finishers making little margin in previous years.

Store Lambs have  meet with steady demand as farmers who have sent lambs away look to restock, combined with more cropping farmers on the hunt for lambs.

North and Mid Canterbury has had some rainfall and with good weather which has combined into good pasture growth. South Otago is well behind in pasture growth this year with little rainfall in some areas.

Dairy

With Gypsy Day looming, trade in dairy livestock is into the business end of the season.

As the season rolls on vendor and purchaser expectations are drawing closer together, which means deals are becoming more frequent.

Herd sales contracted for 1 June delivery have been completed steadily over the past few weeks, priced in the $1500 to $1900 per head range, depending on quality. Most sales have proceeded at between $1600 and $1700 per head.

A series of on-farm clearing sales is also under way, with at least a dozen auctions in Waikato, Taranaki and Manawatu scheduled through until the final week of May. Early enquiry for these has been strong, and the auctions should go well, particularly when the higher quality herds go under the hammer.

Positive indications for dairy returns have provided the market with less impetus than might have been expected. Although the Global Dairy Trade’s recent trend is good news, it is not yet stirring the dairy livestock trade along as much as you might expect. Although there is some feelgood, other factors are holding farmers in check.

Overall, steady market progress is expected during the coming weeks, with quality stock selling well at stable values and minimal variance on current trends.

Genetics

March has seen the Genetics Team’s attention shift to the upcoming two year old bull sale season. Pockets of the country have seen a favourable summer season, which has resulted in their offering more forward than years previous. In other areas however, the dry first months of the year has given the opposite, which has seen the bulls, and their vendors, challenged. We are still in the early stages of inspecting, and we expect most to realise their potential in time for sale day. Sales are set to start in May, and as distant as this may sound, it always comes around quickly. It pays to be ahead of the game when selecting and sourcing seed stock, so get in touch with your local genetics representative today to see where we can assist you in breeding better business.

16 April 2019 Community

PGG Wrightson TFR wins the East Coast Young Farmer of the Year

The 2019 Young Farmer of the Year competition is New Zealand's Ultimate Rural Challenge inspiring excellence, showcasing innovation and growing human capabilities.

The East Coast regional final, held on 13 April 2019, saw eight finalists tackle a series of gruelling modules at Pukemiro Station in Dannevirke. Joseph Watts, PGG Wrightson Technical Field Representative ‘fiercely-contested’ for the last remaining spot in the grand finale.

To take out this placing, Joseph competed in a series of tasks including operating a drone to spot a water leak, a butchery challenge, weighing and shearing sheep and artificial breeding.

The practical event was followed by a fast-paced agri-knowledge quiz hosted by Te Radar at the Dannevirke Town Hall.

“I’m pretty stoked, but I’m a bit nervous about the next couple of months. I don’t have long to prepare for the grand final in July,” Joseph said.

Joseph’s win netted him $12,000 worth of prizes, including a Honda XR150 and a WorkSafe leadership course in Wellington. Joseph also took home awards for being the most tech-savvy of the group, outstanding leadership skills and showcasing innovation.

Stay tuned to see Joseph compete in the grand final in Hawke’s Bay on 4-6 July 2019.

Community

Agonline April 2018 Update
15 April 2019

Diary Livestock Market Approaches Business End of the Season

With Gypsy Day looming, trade in dairy livestock is into the business end of the season.

According to PGG Wrightson National Dairy Sales Manager Jamie Cunninghame, as the season rolls on vendor and purchaser expectations are drawing closer together, which means deals are becoming more frequent.

“Herd sales contracted for 1 June delivery have been completed steadily over the past few weeks, priced in the $1500 to $1900 per head range, depending on quality. Most sales have proceeded at between $1600 and $1700 per head.

“A series of on-farm clearing sales is also under way, with at least a dozen auctions in Waikato, Taranaki and Manawatu scheduled through until the final week of May. Early enquiry for these has been strong, and the auctions should go well, particularly when the higher quality herds go under the hammer,” he said. Information about the schedule of clearing sales is on the AgOnline website.
Jamie Cunninghame said positive indications for dairy returns have provided the market with less impetus than might have been expected.

“Although the Global Dairy Trade’s recent trend is good news, it is not yet stirring the dairy livestock trade along as much as you might expect. Although there is some feelgood, other factors are holding farmers in check.

“South Island farmers who culled herds due to Mycoplasma Bovis are now repopulating, though that activity is not sufficient to alter the market. However, with the tough spring and dry summer leaving empty rates higher than normal, farmers going to market to maintain herd numbers are driving impetus somewhat. Additionally, export cattle are still going to China, with farmers who have capitalised now looking to replace numbers. Export enquiry responds quickly to global dairy prices, so more export activity is likely,” he said.

Overall, Jamie Cunninghame expects steady market progress during the coming weeks, with quality stock selling well at stable values and minimal variance on current trends.

12 April 2019

PGG Wrightson Livestock Roundup April 12 2019

Mark Leishman talks to PGW Livestock GM, Peter Moore in the latest Livestock Update.  This week’s interview focuses on the strong market for store lambs, the feed conditions for Autumn, Brexit and the upcoming launch for Bidr. 

Market Prices
Recent store stock sales around the country  are seeing the sheep market maintain it’s value. With big sales happening at Stortford Lodge and Feilding. 

Feed Conditions
Feed conditions are less than ideal for this time of the year. The country is green but with the cooler ground temperatures and low soil moisture means pasture growth is slow. 

Brexit 
With a further delay on the decision around Brexit, exporters are left with uncertainty for the future. 

Bidr Launch 
The launch of Bidr is approaching fast, with the official launch taking place at the National Fieldays. 

Beef Weaning
5 April 2019 Andrew Dowling

Beef weaning checklist

There is always a lot to think about at weaning. Working through the below checklist may help ensure the essentials get done.

  • Calves should have been given a 5-in-1 vaccine at calf marking, but as this was more than six weeks ago the vaccination programme needs to be completed. Vaccinate at weaning and again four to six weeks later. Some vaccines have differing dose rates based on the age of the animal. 
  • Calves may not require drenching at weaning and can be a valuable source of refugia.  
  • Drenches need to contain levamisole to provide effective control against Cooperia. Weaner beef calves do not require drenching as frequently as weaned lambs, as they are older and better able to manage a worm challenge. 
  • Trace element supplementation needs to be tailored to your farm, as winter forage crops often deplete animal reserves of copper, selenium and possibly phosphorus. The importance of iodine supplementation is not well understood in young cattle.
  • Check that all NAIT tags are in place and recorded.  
  • If you are transporting cull cows, check your obligations on the “Fit for Transport” app from MPI, or the MPI website.  If unsure, contact your PGG Wrightson Livestock Representative for advice.  
  • Quarantine drench with Zolvix™ Plus.
  • Monitor weaned cows for magnesium staggers. Feeding silage can help alleviate issues when cows walk the fence lines and do not graze or during poor weather immediately after weaning. 

To reduce animal and staff stress, consider delaying some treatments, don’t try to do everything at once.  For advice around any of the requirements at weaning, contact your local PGG Wrightson Technical Field Representative.

Andrew Dowling

Early Order Programme
3 April 2019 External Supplier

Ordering early for peace-of-mind

For Jeremy Bennett of Benlee Farms Ltd just west of Matamata, maize silage is an essential part of their farming system. Maize silage de-risks their pasture based system providing them with a consistent quantity of feed to support their high stocking rate.

Jeremy and Lucy Bennett in partnership with their parents’ David and Raewyn Bennett, milk 1460 cows on 326 ha (4.5 cows per ha) split between two properties at Richmond Downs, just west of Matamata. The Bennett’s produce around 735,000 kilograms of Milk Solids (kgMS) annually (2,250 kgMS per ha, 500kgMS per cow).

The hilly nature of the farm means that pasture production can be variable, particularly in seasons like the current one. With consistent yields, maize silage provides the security of feed supply needed to underpin the Bennett’s pasture-based production system resulting in consistently high milk production. The Bennetts plant 93 ha of maize, 53 ha of P9400 on farm and 40 ha of P0021 on a runoff near Matamata. Although none of the blocks are weighed, Jeremy budgets on the crops yielding around 20 tDM per ha meaning the cows are fed around 1.3 tDM maize silage per cow.  

As the lowest cost complimentary feed available to the cows, maize silage is a critical part of the farm system. It is essential that the 93 ha of maize provides enough feed to fill the feed gaps that nature and a high stocking rate seem to regularly provide. De-risking the maize growing system is critical to the overall farm system. To this end, Jeremy does the following:

  1. Gets the best advice. 
    The Bennett’s have had a long-term relationship with the team at PGG Wrightson Matamata and with Pioneer. PGG Wrightson Regional Sales Manager, Mike Lissington and Technical Field Representative, Robbie Corrin work closely with Grant Douglas, Pioneer’s Area Manager to ensure the Bennetts get the best advice around hybrid choice and general agronomics.

  2. Uses shorter maturity hybrids on farm.
    Choosing P9400 to grow on farm ensures that although they may sacrifice a little top end yield, ryegrass is replanted in mid-March, ensuring more than enough time for it to establish before winter.

  3. Benefits of Pioneer’s early order programme each autumn.
    This means that if anything goes wrong at either planting or harvest, Jeremy has peace of mind knowing that the seed will be replaced and he will get $100 per bag towards his planting costs.

  4. Grows maize across two locations. 
    Two locations and two soil types further de-risks maize production, particularly in a year like this. While the home farm maize has struggled in the dry, the runoff block has established well, meaning overall there should be similar amounts of maize silage as previous years.

Contact your local PGG Wrightson Technical Field Representative to ensure your order for this spring’s maize is in place.

Supplied by Pioneer Brand Products

External Supplier

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