Header Image

Helping grow
the country

< Back to Blog
Linking Both Ends of the Chain
2 October 2019

Wool News: New Wool Integrity declaration coming soon

PGG Wrightson’s Wool Integrity programme, established in 2015, currently has some 1200 grower members and approximately 30 international brand partners. It provides assurances to the international market place by addressing concerns around global issues such as animal welfare and environmental sustainability. Wool quality, traceability, health, safety and wellbeing, and social compliance are also encompassed within the Wool Integrity programme.

For participating growers, PGG Wrightson through our-in house wool export company Bloch & Behrens, uses this differentiated marketing to add value to your wool clip without adding cost.

To ensure we can more effectively meet the ever-growing demands of the international marketplace, we will shortly contact all existing and new Wool Integrity growers to complete an updated Wool Integrity declaration.

 

Want to know more and be the first to read future Wool News articles?

Sign up to receive Wool News email updates >

Related Articles

Wool News: Constable's shearing prowess a Facebook Sensation

02 October 2019

PGG Wrightson Wool rep Stuart McNaughton was at David and Pam Nind’s Remarkables Farm, near Frankton in early July as they were shearing. Stuart was surprised to see a police vehicle outside the shed. Going inside he was more surprised to see a police officer. Surprise number three came when the constable picked up a handpiece and began shearing a ewe from the nearest pen!

Constable Blair Duffy of the Queenstown Police often works with shearing contractors and others in rural communities, and enjoys rolling up his sleeves to keep his hand in shearing when he has the opportunity.

PC Duffy’s story, along with a couple of photos of him in action with one of the Nind’s two-tooth ewes, went down well when it was posted on the PGG Wrightson Wool Facebook page, reaching over a quarter of a million people delighted to see the community-minded constable doing his thing on the boards.

Not so much PC gone mad as PC gone viral.

Check out the post here and be sure to like our page for more updates!

 

Want to know more and be the first to read future Wool News articles?

Sign up to receive Wool News email updates >

Wool News: Maintaining minimum Vegetable Matter levels

02 October 2019

This pre-lamb shearing season, in both North and South Islands, vegetable matter (VM) contamination has noticeably increased. 

Several tests are performed on wool prior to sale. These use the core sample taken from each bale within a specific line or lot. They include measuring micron, yield, colour (except for merino), and VM, which is reported as a percentage of the weight of a greasy wool sample and is measured after the wool fibre has been dissolved, leaving any plant material. 

While a VM test between zero and 0.1 per cent is unlikely to attract any discount, as the percentage increases so do the discounts. This season many crossbred fleece lines, both full wool and second shear, have returned VM tests between 0.5 and 1.0 per cent, which negatively impacts pricing in an already difficult market. Fine wool clips, particularly from high country areas, traditionally carry higher VM readings due to the nature of the country grazed. However, because fine wool is generally processed via a worsted system, compared to the majority of crossbred types going through a woollen system, VM in fine wool can largely be removed during the carding, combing and gilling processes prior to spinning. 

However, removing as much VM as practically possible, in the wool shed, remains crucial. Good shed preparation ensures maximum market exposure.

 

Want to know more and be the first to read future Wool News articles?

Sign up to receive Wool News email updates >

Wool News: PFASs in synthetic carpets further boosts sustainability of wool

02 October 2019

Awareness of the potential health and environmental hazards associated with some chemicals used in commercial interiors is growing, further reinforcing the arguments for designers, manufacturers, and consumers to shift towards natural raw materials, such as wool.

Synthetic carpets may typically include a group of chemicals called perfluorinated or polyfluorinated alkyl substances, more commonly known as PFASs. While these are valued for their stain-repellent qualities, they are also known as ‘forever chemicals’ because they may never fully degrade in the environment. In some literature PFASs have been negatively associated with potential health problems in people.

Since the 1940s these ‘forever chemicals’ have been used in a wide range of products including carpets and furniture, as well as camping gear and non-stick cookware. They are now found in the air and water around the globe, as well as in the bodies of nearly everyone on earth.

As consumers and manufacturers become better educated regarding the possible negative characteristics of PFASs, we are likely to see a move away from synthetic carpets, and back towards wool.

 

Want to know more and be the first to read future Wool News articles?

Sign up to receive Wool News email updates >

Share this page